Getting your wage deposited into a trust Bank Account and the risks

A client has advised they were ‘advised’, on an expensive course, to deposit their wage into a bank account of the trustee of a trust rather than into their own personal bank account..

This is for asset protection supposedly.

The idea is that the money never touches your account so it cannot fall into the hands of creditors.

How silly!

In situations such as this, the trustee would be holding the money for you as bare trustee. There is no asset protection if you were to go bankrupt, die or go through a family law property settlement as it is still your money.

Furthermore, you have additional issues to consider such as what if the trustee

  1. Dies
  2. Goes bankrupt
  3. Loses capacity
  4. Gets divorced
  5. steals

You would probably have worse asset protection issues.

If you did end up bankrupt the money could easily be clawed back.

Tip: Don’t do this without proper legal advice tailored to your situation.

Discuss at https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-232-getting-your-wage-deposited-into-a-trust-bank-account.40643/

Electronic Signing of Deeds – Don’t!

I have recently come across a client who had their trust deed signed by the settlor, electronically. The settlor had inserted a jpeg of her signature in the deed and emailed it to the client for signing. There was no original copy. It was also electronically signed by the witness of the settlor. It is not known if the witness was present with the settlor when it was signed, or if they signed the same document.

This deed would fail. It is not executed.

Another client had their deed signed by the accountant who set the trust up, but it was also witnessed electronically – one of the accountant’s witnessed the client’s signature. Interestingly signatures were ‘witnessed’ from afar!

This deed also fails.

Deeds cannot be signed electronically in any state of Australia. There is one exception now due to recent amendments to the Conveyancing Act, s 38A, in NSW. This new legislation does allow for deeds to be signed electronically, from 2019, but the legislation does not cover side issues such as how can an electronically signed deed be witnessed? When 2 people sign a document on different computers they are not signing the same document so will this be valid?

Can companies sign electronically?

What happens when someone dealing with the trustee wants to see the original deed? If you were to print it out would it be original? How could a certified copy of the deed be made?

My tip: Do not sign any deed electronically, even if you are an individual based in NSW. Print out the deeds and sign with a pen.

If you have signed a deed electronically seek legal advice on how to rectify this problem, even if located in NSW. And don’t go back to the same firm that caused the problem in the first place as they are likely to not know about the issue or how to fix it.

Discuss at:

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-222-electronic-signing-of-deeds-dont.40226/

Trusts and Incapacity

There are several issues which can arise when a member of a trust loses their mental capacity.

Trustees – a trustee must have mental capacity to act as trustee. Where capacity is lost, and that person is a trustee they will automatically be removed as trustee. The terms of the trust deed will need to be read to determine what happens next. Often it will be up to the appointor to appoint a new trustee.

A trustee’s attorney cannot act in their place.

Example

Homer is trustee of the Simpson Family Trust. Homer has appointed Barney as his attorney, under an enduring power of attorney document, if Homer where to lose capacity. Homer does lose capacity and can no longer act as trustee. However, Barney cannot act as trustee in Homer’s place.

Appointors – The appointor of the trust is the person who has the power to hire and fire the trustee. Also called the Principal or Controller in some deeds. If an Appointor loses capacity often, they are automatically removed as appointor – this is often built into the deed of the trust. If this happens a successor appointor appointed by the trust deed or a second deed may determine who the next appointor is. Where there is none there may be no appointor of the trust. Where the trustee and the appointor are the same person this could causes problems as the trust would be out of anyone’s control and an application may be needed to the Supreme Court for them to appoint a new trustee (very costly).

Where the appointor is not automatically removed then the appointor’s attorney may be able to exercise the power of appointment of the appointor.

Example

Homer has made an enduring power of attorney appointing Barney to act on Homer’s behalf. Homer is the trustee and Appointor of the Simpson family trust. Homer loses capacity. Barney cannot use the POA to become trustee, but he can exercise Homer’s power as appointor of the trust to appoint himself as trustee.

Beneficiaries – a beneficiary is just a potential recipient of income and/or capital of the trust. A beneficiary losing capacity doesn’t change this, they can still receive income and/or capital from the trust.

Company Trustees – If a director of a company loses capacity often the company constitution will work to automatically remove that person as director of the company. If a shareholder loses capacity their attorney can act in their shoes by using the voting power and shareholders can vote in a new director. A director’s attorney cannot act as director but must be appointed director of the company first.

It is also possible for a company to have successor directors or substitute directors. These are appointed by the constitution of the company and need to be set up before capacity is lost.

Example

Homer is the sole director of Simpson Nominees Pty Ltd which acts as trustee for the Simpson Family Trust. Homer has appointed Barney as his Attorney. Homer loses capacity. Barney cannot simply start acting as director of the company or operating its bank accounts etc. The shareholders of the company must appoint a new director. In this company Marg owns 50% of the shares and Homer owns 50% of the shares so a meeting of shareholders would need to be called a vote counted – Barney could vote on Homer’s behalf and Marg on her own behalf (the constitution would deal with situations where there is a 50/50 tie in voting).

However, it is later recalled that the constitution of the company was amended a few years ago so that if the current director lost capacity Bart Simpson would immediately be director – no further consent was required (however the shareholders could vote Bart out, depending on the constitution of the company)

Discuss at

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-219-trusts-and-incapacity.39809/

Strategy to Avoid CGT for generations to come (forever?)

When someone dies their assets pass via their will, or intestacy laws, without triggering CGT. The beneficiary’s cost base of the asset is generally the same as the cost base of the person who left it to them.

Example

Homer dies and leaves some shares to Bart. Neither Bart nor the estate pay CGT on the shares passing through to Bart. If Bart sells, he would pay CGT on the shares and his cost base would be the same as Homer’s cost base. So if Homer bought them for $100,000 and they were worth $500,000 on Homer’s death and Bart held them for 10 years and then sold them for $1mil, Bart’s cost base would be $100,000 and he would have made a capital gain of $900,000 (the tax would be about $210,000).

But if the shares are not sold but hung onto and the passed on via the beneficiary’s will, there will still be no CGT payable until they are sold.

Example cont.

Bart inherits Homer’s shares and then Bart dies. Bart some Bartyboy inherits the shares. If Bartyboy sells the shares his cost base will be $100,000.

So, the way to avoid CGT is for each generation of the family to keep the shares without selling. Selling the assets inherited is like killing the goose that lays the golden eggs.

Shares could be sold and later the proceeds reinvested, but each time they are sold up to 25% of the value is lost in CGT. Therefore, not selling for hundreds of years could allow for some massive compounding.

But what about the inflexibility of income distribution? One drawback of inheriting shares is that there is little opportunity to divert income to a spouse, and/or children unless they are held in a discretionary trust. Holding assets in a discretionary trust means those assets cannot pass via a person’s will. Trusts generally must vest every 80 years so that means CGT would be triggered every 80 years time, wiping out about 25% of the value of the assets.

However, there is a way around this too.

In this thread,

Tax Tip 194: Transferring a Property from a Testamentary Trust to a Beneficiary Without CGT            https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/tax-tip-194-transferring-a-property-from-a-testamentary-trust-to-a-beneficiary-without-cgt.38844/

I showed how it is possible to transfer assets out of a testamentary discretionary trust (TDT) to a beneficiary without triggering CGT.

Therefore, the solution to avoid paying tax is to set up a TDT in the will. Upon the death of the testator the assets will pass to one of more trustees of a TDT. Income from the shares can be streamed to the primary beneficiary and their spouses and children with real tax advantages (as well as asset protection).

When that primary beneficiary is about to die, or possibly even after their death, the assets of the trust, such as shares are transferred into their estate and then out into a new TDT. Their children will control this trust and can stream the income out and then upon their death, the same thing can happen.

The result is hundreds of years of compounding of the capital based with very little tax paid on the dividends in between – in theory, and assuming current laws allowing this will not change.

Example

Homer is fit and healthy and writes his will incorporating a TDT for each child. Homer buys some shares and keeps compounding the returns so that at his death he has a large amount paying good dividends. His will leaves 1/3 to each of 3 TDTs each controlled by one of his children.

Bart controls one TDT and keeps the shares in it with the income being streamed to his children and spouse largely tax free. Bart keeps investing in shares outside the TDT (as injecting money into it won’t result in tax savings).

Bart comes down with a diagnosis of cancer and has 4 weeks to live. Dr Hibbert tells him the bad news and says sorry it has taken you 3 weeks to get an appointment to see me, you only have 1 week left.

Bart causes the assets to be distributed from the TDT to himself, without triggering CGT.

Bart dies a few days later.

Bart’s estate is now much larger than when Homer died.

Bart’s will also has a TDT and he goes for the same strategy.

Bartboy junior continues the tradition and does the same thing as his dad, Bart.

Bartyboy  junior dies at a rave party, without children. But luckily his wills sets up a TDT with his siblings taking over the tradition.

This strategy can work well with shares as there is no stamp duty on the transfer of shares, but with property passing from a trustee to a individual is it likely to trigger duty in many states – perhaps exemptions might apply in VIC and WA in certain situations.

The best thing though is if one generation decides they want to sell up and abandon the tradition, then there will still be tax savings by utilising a Testamentary Discretionary Trust.

Discuss at:

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/tax-tip-220-strategy-to-avoid-cgt-for-generations-to-come-forever.39833/

Why you should avoid appointing a successor appointor in a Trust via a will

I often see discretionary trust deeds which nominate the next appointor, upon the death of the current appointor, to be the Legal Personal Representative (LPR) of the last appointor upon their death. On death the LPR of the deceased is the executor or administrator of the will.

This is a bad idea!

Example

Homer has set up a trust without getting legal advice. Homer is the sole appointor of the trust and there has been no thought given to what happens after his death. The deed is worded in such a way that the LPR of Homer will become the next appointor. The trust holds assets of approx. $2mil when Homer dies.

What could happen?

  1. Homer’s will appoint his mate Barney as his executor – Barney is now appointor of the trust and removes the current trustee and appoints a company he controls, or
  2. Homer’s nominated executor refuses to act and it ends up being the public trustee that becomes the LPR. They would immediately remove the trustee and appoint a trustee that they control. This would be much safer than Barney being in control, but they may have different ideas on who can benefit from the trust, or
  3. Aunt Thelma could be the only one that applies for Administration of Homer’s estate as he died without a valid will. She is the LPR. Now she is the appointor of the trust. She is also a beneficiary of the trust and the trust deed permits the trustee to act even though there may be a conflict of interest. Thelma could milk the trust and benefit herself at the expense of Homer’s children
  4. More practically speaking, the LPR is only appointed once the courts have granted Probate or Administration. This could take 6 months of more. So until this happens the trust will be without an appointor. If the deceased person was the trustee or the sole director and shareholder of the trustee company the trust will be under no one’s control until the LPR is appointed. This means no access to bank accounts, no ability to make a beneficiary presently entitled to income, of it crosses the end of June, which means the top marginal tax rate on all trust income. Any sales of property won’t be able to happen, contracts entered into may not be able to be completed – litigation potentially resulting.

Solution – seek legal advice about appointing a successor appointor now, via a separate deed. If the trust deed doesn’t allow this, seek legal advice on having the deed amended to allow it.

Keep any clause relating to the next appointor being nominated in the will as a back up, and avoid having the LPR being the next appointor.

Discuss at

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-216-why-you-should-avoid-appointing-a-successor-appointor-in-a-trust-via-a-will.39689/

Asset Protection and Clawback Provisions

When entering any transaction, especially related party transactions, consider the clawback provisions under the Bankruptcy Act, the 2 main ones being:

Section 120. Undervalued transactions see

http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ba1966142/s120.html

Section 121. Transfers to defeat creditors

See http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/ba1966142/s121.html

Most people forget about the state legislation as well:

e.g. Conveyancing Act 1919 (NSW)

Section 37A. Voluntary alienation to defraud creditors voidable

See http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/ca1919141/s37a.html

Each State has its own legislation similar to the s37A

What the above sections mean is that a transaction entered into with the intent of defeating creditors or putting property out of reach of the trustee in bankruptcy (if you were to go bankrupt) could be attacked. This can even apply to future creditors.

So, take care in how you do things, especially related party transfers such as changing title on property, declaring trusts or moving cash.

Discussion at

https://propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-2-asset-protection.224/

Strategy of Borrowing from a Testamentary Trust instead of Winding it Up

Testamentary Discretionary Trusts (TDT) are the best sort of trust out there, but someone has to die for them to come into existence. So, they are relatively rare. Also, the capital of the trust has to come from the deceased for the extra tax benefits to work (excepted trust income).

So, I cringe when clients approach me wanting to wind up a TDT that their parent has left them in control of.

Their idea usually goes something like this. I have a $1mil loan on my main residence and the trust holds $1mil worth of assets. If I wind up the trust, I can pay off my home loan and save interest.

It is a valid point, but once a TDT is closed it can’t be reopened again, and even if kept open new capital can be injected, but income generated from it would not qualify as except trust income and would not get the concessional tax treatment in the hands of children.

There is a simple way around this though, and that is to get the trustee to make you an interest free loan.

Example

Bart’s dad Homer dies and leaves $1mil to a trustee of a TDT set up under his will. Bart has a $1mil home loan so winds up the trust and pays off the loan.

Lisa is in the same position, but she controls a separate, but identical trust. Lisa gets the trustee to lend her $1mil interest free which she uses to pay off her loan. She has not no deductible debt now. So, she uses the $3,000 she was paying the bank each month to pay back the trust.

The trust now has money with which to invest. The income from these investments can go to Lisa’s children tax free – because they can each earn $20,000 pa tax free so it will be ages before the trust’s income is more than this.

Meanwhile Bart is making the same investments as Lisa, but he receives the income himself and is taxed at 47%

Over the next 15 years or so Lisa would have probably repaid the full $1mil back to the trust so it is now generating about $40,000 per year in income which comes out tax free to her kids.

Once the kids start working, she will have to reassess where the income goes, but until then there are huge savings.

Tip – Don’t wind up a testamentary trust without careful consideration and legal advice.

Note that this would also give great asset protection as well.

Discussion at:

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-115-strategy-of-borrowing-from-a-testamentary-trust-instead-of-winding-it-up.39662/

Transfer of Property to a Special Disability Trust and Stamp duty Exemptions

In NSW there is a stamp duty exemption for the transfer of property to a Special Disability Trust (SDT). This can apply for a declaration of trust s65(22)(a) or (b) Duties Act 1997 (NSW) or for a transfer to the trustee of an SDT s65(22)(c).  http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/da199793/s65.html

There are similar provisions in other states too, including:

Section 38A Duties Act 2000 (VIC)
http://www8.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/viewdoc/au/legis/vic/consol_act/da200093/s38a.html

Section 126A Duties Act 2001 (QLD)
http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/qld/consol_act/da200193/s126a.html

 Example

Homer has an investment property which he wishes to transfer to a special disability trust for his daughter who has a severe disability. Title is transferred from Homer’s name to that of a professional trustee and there is no stamp duty charged on this transfer.

Note that there are also CGT exemptions available too.

See:

Tax Tip 159: No CGT on Transfer to a Special Disability Trust            https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/tax-tip-159-no-cgt-on-transfer-to-a-special-disability-trust.23076/

Discuss at

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/tax-tip-215-transfer-of-property-to-a-special-disability-trust-and-stamp-duty-exemptions.39643/

Helping an Elderly Parent Buy a new property

Get some legal advice before trying this.

Some people want to help their elderly parent(s) purchase property. This might be the parents moving to a more suitable property or the parents becoming owners instead of renting.

Helping the parents into a property can also help the children too, because they may potentially inherit the property at a later date and there can be great tax concessional along the way.

There are basically 3 main ways an adult child could help a parent into a property:

a. gift

b. loan – at interest or interest free

c. purchasing part of the property.

There are various estate planning consequences to each of these and also practical consequences.

Some things to consider:

  • if the parents own the home it might be 100% CGT and land tax exempt, if the child owns part it may not be completely exempt.
  • If one child made a gift and they have siblings and the parents die before they gift giver then the other siblings may also benefit from the gift.
  • if it was a gift and you died the next day after making the gift your family would potentially miss out
  • If it was an interest free loan and nothing done for 6 years it could become unenforceable
  • If they have incorporated a testamentary discretionary trust in their will and it the gift all came back to ‘you’ this could provide tax free income to your minor children for years to come.
  • If you gift it and parent A dies first parent B might remarry…

An example of how It could work

Bart and Lisa are adults with one parent left – Homer. Homer lost his house years ago and is renting. Bart and Lisa each have their own homes fully paid off and some cash in the offset accounts to their separately owned investment properties.

Bart finds a property with development potential. It is just around the corner from where Homer lives in his rented flat. Bart is going to purchase the property and is deciding what entity to put it in when he has an idea.

The property purchase price is $500,000. He has enough cash to pay for it so he could just buy it outright, but since his dad is not getting a main residence exemption for CGT Bart talks to Homer, his dad, and they decide to buy it in Homer’s name.

Homer signs the contract and Bart lends him the 10% deposit with a promise to lend him the rest for settlement.

Bart then realises that if Homer dies his sister Lisa will end up with half the property. So to make things fairer he talks to Lisa and gives her 2 options

  1. Lisa put in 50% of the purchase price at settlement, or
  2. Homer leaves the whole property to Bart and Lisa agrees not to challenge this if it happens.

Bart and Lisa decide to ‘go 50/50’ and each lend Homer $250,000 and Homer settles on the property. It is a 5 year interest free loan which they intend to renew each 5 years.

Bart arranges various approvals and the property is now worth $1mil when Homer dies 4 years later.

Under the terms of the will of Homer 50% of his assets would go into each of 2 testamentary discretionary trusts with one controlled by Bart and one controlled by Lisa.

They each now have 50% of an additional property which would be could be sold tax free or held onto with a cost base of $1mil. There has been no land tax along the way because this was Homer’s main residence and they have each gained further tax deductions by using cash in their offset accounts.

Furthermore, any income generated from the property from that point could be streamed to their minor children, as beneficiaries of the trust, with each child getting around $20,000 without having to pay tax.

Just before Homer’s death they also forgave the loans they made him – so this meant that an extra $500,000 was driven into the testamentary discretionary trust so they could generate even more tax free income.

Discuss at:

            Legal Tip 208: Helping an Elderly Parent Buy a new property            https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-208-helping-an-elderly-parent-buy-a-new-property.39377/

Written by Terryw Lawyer at www.structuringlawyers.com.au

Trusts for Unborn Beneficiaries?

For a trust to exist there must be at least one beneficiary, but there is no legal requirement that the beneficiary must be alive at the date the trust is created (as long as there are one or more other beneficiaries that are alive).

People not yet in existence can be beneficiaries by their relationship to someone else.

Example

Homer may set up a trust under his will for his children and grandchildren. His children are the Primary Beneficiaries, they are named or better yet, not named but listed by Homer as “my children” – just in case he has more kids after making the will. The Secondary Beneficiaries would include ‘my grandchildren’

Homer dies with all of his children being about 12 years old or less with no grandchildren, but 20 years later when Homer’s son Bart has a son, that son will automatically be a beneficiary of the trust set up 20 years earlier because he is a grandson of Homer.

This has important estate planning and tax consequences as the grandchildren could be earning $20k per year and not paying any tax.

Discuss at

https://www.propertychat.com.au/community/threads/legal-tip-209-trusts-for-unborn-beneficiaries.39428/